To discover Gianna Yan seven or eight years from now, head to the White House. Yes, that White House, the one in Washington, D.C.

“I’m going to be working in the White House Office of Science and Technology,” says Piedmont High School pupil Yan, 16, who’s already planning her profession and its footprint that she hopes to go away for future generations.

Piedmont High School pupil Gianna Yan, 16, is a NASA intern and a 2021 scholarship winner in Apple’s tenth annual Student Swift Challenge, by which college students submit code written in Apple’s Swift programming language. Her app, Feed Fleet, paired seniors and at-risk people, particularly individuals in communities struggling extreme meals insecurity, with volunteers who delivered meals and different important items throughout the pandemic. (photograph courtesy of Gianna Yan) 

“I got to meet Representative Barbara Lee a few years ago and realized we can make social change just through changing legislative policies. I want to further the movement of computer science education throughout K-12 schooling. I had tech resources, but there are inadequate resources overall in the Oakland Unified School District. If we’re going to have a more just future, we need to teach the next generation of girls and people of color computer science skills.”

Yan’s daring assertion is greater than a mouthful of sizzling air spouted by an clever, inventive, assured younger lady of tomorrow. In 2019, she gained U.S. Rep. Jackie Speier’s, D-Hillsborough, Congressional App Challenge with @bay, an app that streamlines the voting course of for millennials and will increase civic engagement in youth communities.

Yan can also be a NASA intern and a 2021 scholarship winner in Apple’s tenth annual Student Swift Challenge, by which college students submit code written in Apple’s Swift programming language. Her app, Feed Fleet, was submitted and featured in a presentation Yan gave on the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference this 12 months. The app paired seniors and at-risk people, particularly individuals in communities struggling extreme meals insecurity, with volunteers who delivered meals and different important items throughout the pandemic.

Piedmont High School pupil Gianna Yan, 16, says she plans to ultimately work within the White House Office of Science and Technology and is already planning her profession and its footprint that she hopes to go away for future generations of ladies, ladies and folks of coloration working in science and expertise. (photograph courtesy of Gianna Yan) 

Swift Challenge scholarship winners obtain a one-year membership within the Apple Developer Program, which helps and transforms college students’ code-based concepts and initiatives into actual apps. “Graduates” have constructed profitable careers in expertise, based venture-backed startups and created nonprofits centered on utilizing expertise.

After assembly Lee and throughout the months since successful the scholarship, Yan led workshops to show primary coding expertise to elementary faculty college students from Black, Indigenous and People of Color (BIPOC) communities and joined The Farmland Project, a student-created nonprofit that connects farms with surplus produce to close by meals banks. She is engaged on two apps along with releasing Feed Fleet, one which helps individuals conduct breast most cancers self-examinations and detects coronary heart illness in ladies and one other that assists college students reporting incidents of sexual assault on faculty campuses.

Asked about crucial instruction together with coding expertise that younger individuals all in favour of expertise ought to obtain, Yan says, “There are courses that teach about ethical technology, ethical AI (artificial intelligence), so it’s not just coding. It’s teaching about privacy issues with social media or how computer science can go wrong if users aren’t educated on ethics or humanity.”

Yan’s mom, Renee Liu, teaches math at a Bay Area neighborhood school, and her father, Jim Yan, is a property supervisor. She says her earliest reminiscence of marrying her ardour for social justice with expertise was a TED-style speech she gave about intersectional feminism.

“I was in sixth grade. It’s about how your race, age, gender and sexual orientation intersect. It’s not about oppression; it’s talking about navigating the life that your identity gives you. For example, an Asian American woman and an African American woman are not the same; their experiences are different. … Because of those stereotypes, things that happen and their reactions to them are seen differently. There’s less understating of racial targeting and weaknesses in the justice system.”



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